Digital Ocean Abstracts

 

Long-range acoustic detection and tracking of the humpback whale Hawaii-Alaska migration
Abileah, R.   Martin, D.   Lewis, S.D.   Gisiner, B.  
SRI Int., Menlo Park, CA;
This paper appeared in: OCEANS '96. MTS/IEEE. 'Prospects for the 21st Century'. Conference Proceedings
Meeting Date: 09/23/1996 -09/26/1996
Publication Date: 23-26 Sep 1996
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL ,   USA
On page(s): 373-377 vol.1
Volume: 1,   References Cited: 7
Number of Pages: 4 vol. (1564+vii+145)
INSPEC Accession Number: 5527088


 
Abstract:
In recent years the Navy has provided the scientific community with increased access to the long-range underwater Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS). One of the first applications of this system was to monitor the migratory behavior of acoustically active pelagic whales (e.g., blue, humpback, finback). In 1995 the authors compared SOSUS detections of humpback whales with the positions of satellite telemetry-tagged humpbacks. The results suggest that SOSUS can reliably track whale migratory patterns by remote and non-intrusive real-time coverage of large areas of ocean that would be impossible to monitor by any other means. They also discuss the possibility of using SOSUS to estimate whale populations by “turnstile” monitoring of whales passing through a selected portion of the migratory path

 

 

Monitoring high-seas fisheries with long-range passive acoustic sensors
Abileah, R.   Lewis, D.  
SRI Int., Menlo Park, CA;
This paper appeared in: OCEANS '96. MTS/IEEE. 'Prospects for the 21st Century'. Conference Proceedings
Meeting Date: 09/23/1996 -09/26/1996
Publication Date: 23-26 Sep 1996
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL ,   USA
On page(s): 378-382 vol.1
Volume: 1,   References Cited: 1
Number of Pages: 4 vol. (1564+vii+145)
INSPEC Accession Number: 5527089
 

Abstract:
The decline of the world's major fisheries has spurred international conservation efforts. Toward this goal, various technological means of monitoring fishing have been implemented. The authors report on experiments with passive acoustic listening, using the US Navy's Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS). They describe some of the results obtained in a series of experiments over the 1992-1995 period on driftnet fishing (now banned by international treaty), salmon poaching in the North Pacific, and trawlers in the Bering Sea “Donut Hole”

Use of high resolution space imagery to monitor the abundance, distribution, and migration patterns of marine mammal populations
Abileah, R.  
SRI Int., Menlo Park, CA;
This paper appeared in: OCEANS, 2001. MTS/IEEE Conference and Exhibition
Meeting Date: 11/05/2001 -11/08/2001
Publication Date: 2001
Location: Honolulu, HI ,   USA
On page(s): 1381-1387 vol.3
Volume: 3,   References Cited: 8
Number of Pages: 4 vol.(lxv+lxi+2714)
INSPEC Accession Number: 7231325
 

Abstract:
Aerial surveys are routinely used to study marine mammal populations. The resolution of imagery from commercial satellites has improved to the point where individual marine mammals can be detected. It may therefore be possible to perform remote sensing of marine mammal populations from space. This paper presents an initial assessment of detectability. A simple signal and noise model is developed to predict the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a whale-like target. SNR is calculated for three cases: detection limited by sensor quantization noise ("best case"); detection in real noise, using one spectral band image; and detection in real noise, using a two-band noise reduction technique. An Ikonos satellite image was used for a realistic noise spectrum. The calculations show that a canonical target of length =14 in and average spectral reflectivity can be detected up to a depth of 24 m. Thus a case can be made for using satellites to monitor marine mammal abundance and geographical distributions, and to observe migratory patterns in remote areas

 

 

 

2005 R. Abileah     Last Update Sunday October 07, 2007